girl-in-the attic

www.phenomenajewelry.etsy.com

admiralpaul:

"Some people don’t sleep at night - I am one of those people. These pictures were taken long after everyone had gone to bed - I would begin after midnight and go until 4 or 5 in the morning. I stopped at sunrise - like a vampire… I never really thought anyone would ever see these pictures, they went into shoeboxes, where they remained. I did everything - I was the stylist, the makeup artist, the furniture mover, the lighting director. It was my joy - I was the model…" - Stevie Nicks

(via buckinghamnicks)

Stevie Nicks's Daughters of the Moon

carriewintour:

image

I’ve been meaning to write something about the importance and influence of Stevie Nicks, but with the launch of Richard Dashut’s new blog, and reading all of the heartfelt commentary on it, I’ve really kicked myself to finally do it.

I kept thinking about one night…

goldduststevie:

Anon request: pics of Stevie in the 70’s with her tamboo

libutron:

Glowing mushrooms - Mycena lux-coeli 
Like fireflies, luminescent squid, and other so-called bioluminescent organisms, glow-in-the-dark mushrooms contain an enzyme known as luciferin. When luciferin is oxidized (i.e. comes in contact with oxygen), it emits energy in the form of light, which causes organisms containing it to glow.
Numerous species of Mycena form luminescent mycelium and/or fruiting bodies. No fewer than 26 species of Mycena have been reported as bioluminescent. This one in the picture is Mycena lux-coeli, native to Japan where it is found almost solely on large shi-no-ki trees (Castanopsis sieboldii, or chinkapins in English), one of the dominant climax species in the native forests of the Kii Peninsula in Japan.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Masahisa Uemura | Locality: Nachikatsuura, Higashimuro District, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan (2013)

libutron:

Glowing mushrooms - Mycena lux-coeli 

Like fireflies, luminescent squid, and other so-called bioluminescent organisms, glow-in-the-dark mushrooms contain an enzyme known as luciferin. When luciferin is oxidized (i.e. comes in contact with oxygen), it emits energy in the form of light, which causes organisms containing it to glow.

Numerous species of Mycena form luminescent mycelium and/or fruiting bodies. No fewer than 26 species of Mycena have been reported as bioluminescent. This one in the picture is Mycena lux-coeli, native to Japan where it is found almost solely on large shi-no-ki trees (Castanopsis sieboldii, or chinkapins in English), one of the dominant climax species in the native forests of the Kii Peninsula in Japan.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Masahisa Uemura | Locality: Nachikatsuura, Higashimuro District, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan (2013)

(via diaryofanearthwitch)